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How to Host a House Concert

Here are some answers to the Frequently Asked Questions about hosting a House Concert. 

How do I get started?

Even if you've never hosted a house concert before, it's as easy as throwing a small party.  First, contact me to settle on a date and other specifics, then invite some friends over and let them know they'll be enjoying a private concert with Terri Bocklund, an award-winning singer/songwriter.  Your level of enthusiasm and your word-of-mouth endorsement of my music to your friends is a valuable promotional tool, and you'll be surprised how people are willing to come and hear someone they've never heard of because it's you who does the inviting.

How do I promote my house concert?

The easiest way to get the word out is via email.  I can provide you with an invitation template complete with MP3 files to make it extra easy for you!

How does Terri get paid?
The general rule of thumb for a house concert is that the money collected from audience donations goes straight to the performers.  You can offer a suggested donation amount ($10 per person would do), or just pass the hat.

How many people should I invite?

Invite as many as possible and accept as many as your room will hold comfortably, with the help of folding chairs and throw pillows.   Depending on the size of the room you'll be using for your house concert, you may want to limit the number of attendees to the number of seats you will have available.

How can I personalize my house concert event?

You can do a lot to make the night  more cozy and personal than going out to hear music. One way is with the food you offer. Some shows turn the event into a full-on potluck. Others simply offer snacks, desserts and soft drinks. Whichever you choose, a refreshment break between sets is part of the charm of the house concert since it gives me a chance to meet and chat with the audience.  Consider including a song circle after the show. It gives the crowd even more of an opportunity to interact with each other, make connections and share some of their own music in an "open mic" kind of atmosphere.